ABH barges designed for lifting projects

A jack-up barge is designed for the support of cranes, excavators and other equipment for nearshore construction, drilling and maintenance works in port and harbours.

The current ABH fleet size comprises eight jack-up barges with deck capacities ranging from 10t to 250t. All of ABH’s jack-up barges are of modular design for flexible and efficient solutions; the modular jack-up barges can be containerised and are easily mobilised anywhere in Oceania.
Due to the modular design, the jack-up barge comprises multiple standardised floating pontoons that are coupled together through a pin/connector system. Modules are sized to allow them to be transportable by road or containerised for sea (or road) transport into 20′ or 40′ ISO containers. Read more

Pick and carry crane road safety

This is a document that introduces a speed limit on pick and carry cranes, whereby under the National Class 1 Special Purpose Vehicle Notice 2016 (No 1) the State Schedules for Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania now state: “A pick and carry crane must not exceed 80kph.”

Pick and carry cranes are our most common crane in Australia with numbers in the thousands. I’ve written many bulletins about them due to the high number of risk factors involved, particularly mobiling with loads. Read more

TIDD turning the corner on pick and carry safety

TIDD turning the corner on pick and carry safety

When TRT released the 25t TIDD PC25 pick and carry crane in 2013, it incorporated a number of safety features such as a Robway LMI system that automatically de-rated the lift chart for articulation and side slope, a ROPS cab with FOPS option, ABS drum brakes and an electro-hydraulic steering system that reduced the steering response as speed increased to overcome the problem of speed wobbles at speed. Greg Keane reports.  Read more

Specialist trailers increase crane set-up efficiency

Specialist trailers increase crane set-up efficiency

For many crane owners, the investment in a large crane doesn’t end with the crane itself: the investment in support trailers and the prime movers to tow them can also be quite substantial. Large cranes can require five to 10 support trailers, or even more for the largest cranes, writes Greg Keane.

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The effects of wind on crane operation

The effects of wind on crane operation

Although it can’t be seen directly, wind can have a massive effect on the safe operation of cranes.  In this article, we will look at some issues relating to cranes and wind, writes Stuart Edwards.

Permissible wind speed

The safe wind speed to operate a crane can be subject to much conjecture and discussion, especially when there is undue “pressure” to complete a job.  However, determining a safe wind speed can be broken down to three simple things.  Read more

Financing as the tide turns

Financing as the tide turns

There is general consensus here and globally that retirement criteria for a crane and the major inspection during its lifetime should not solely be based on the years since it was manufactured. A great many number of factors impact a machine’s lifespan and perhaps more importantly, its inspection and maintenance cycles, writes Jacqueline Ong.

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The impact of tyres on pick and carry crane safety

The impact of tyres on pick and carry crane safety

Pick and carry crane safety has come in for a lot of attention of recent times – both for dynamic safety on the road and safety while working on site with a load. Australasia has a long history of articulated pick and carry cranes, to the extent that there are thousands in operation. Greg Keane reports.

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